Safari Base Game

From WikiCarpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Other languages:
English • ‎italiano • ‎polski

Main Page > Safari > Safari Base Game

Safari cover.png

General info and comments

Safari was originally released by Hans im Glück in 2018.

Africa swelters under the blazing sun, but an adventure on the savanna beckons! Monkeys swing in the trees, lions repose in the shade, and the ground shakes under the thunderous footfalls of elephants. While animals one and all gather at the watering holes, trek out into the bush, lie in wait, and see the majesty of nature unfold!

A note on the title: Today, the term “safari” is used primarily to describe observing wild animals in their natural habitat, and it is used in this sense throughout.

Components and setup

Components

  • 72 Landscape tiles depicting the savanna landscape, animal trails, baobab trees, and the bush where animals congregate.
Tile with animal trail and lion
Tile with elephant in the bush, and baobab tree in the savanna
Tile with bush (including birds), as well as a zebra and a lion on trails
Land tile backs - All tiles share the same back
  • 1 start tile with the size of three land tiles.
Start tile
  • 50 animal / watering hole tiles depicting the five different large animals. Each animal is represented on ten tiles. Four animal tiles can be connected to create a watering hole.
Animal / watering hole tiles
Example of complete watering hole
  • Scoreboard
Scoreboard
  • 5 scoring markers showing 50 and 100
Scoring marker with 50 points on its front
Scoring marker with 100 points on its back
  • 30 meeples, six in each of the following colors: yellow, red, green, blue and black
Meeples
  • 5 elephants, one in each player's color
Elephants
  • 2 white ranger vehicles - these are two neutral figures referred to as "rangers" throughout the rules. The don't belong to any player.
Ranger

Preparation

Shuffle all 72 land tiles, and place them facedown in stacks that are easily accessible to all players. [1]

Land tile stacks

Place the start tile in the middle of the table and place the rangers in the spaces indicated in the illustration below.

Start tile with Rangers

Place the scoreboard off to the side of the play area. Place the score markers next to the it.

Shuffle all 50 animal tokens and distribute two to each player. Each player puts them face up in front of them. Shuffle the rest of them and put them aside, face down. [2]

Animal tokens facing down

Each player chooses a color and takes the six meeples and one elephant of that color to form their personal supply. Place each player‘s elephant on the 0 space. Return all unused meeples and elephants to the box.

Elephants on the scoreboard

Overview and object of the game

Players take turns placing land tiles, expanding the savanna and discovering bush, animal trails, and baobab trees. You place meeples in the bush or on animal trails and complete them to score points for the different animals present, and lay meeples on baobab trees to draw new animal tiles. Animal tiles can score additional points or can be used to dig watering holes in the savanna. Players score points throughout the game as well as at the end of the game. The player with the highest score after final scoring wins.

Gameplay

Carcassonne Safari is played in turns, in clockwise order. Starting with the youngest player, the active player follows these steps in the order listed below, after which the next player takes a turn, and so on. Below is a brief description of the actions you will take on your turn and the different features on the land tiles.

1. Placing a land tile

You must draw draw one land tile from a stack and place it faceup adjacent to any tile already on the board to continue the landscape.
Safari Rules Gameplay Place Land Tile.png

2. Perform action

Choose one of the following:
Place a meeple on the tile you just placed. Safari Rules Gameplay Place Meeple.png
Move one of the two rangers. Safari Rules Gameplay Move Ranger.png
Dig or expand a watering hole. Safari Rules Gameplay Place Animal Tile.png

3. Score a feature

You must score any features completed by the tile you placed this turn, even if other players have meeples on them. Safari Rules Gameplay Score Points.png

The animal trails

1. Placing a land tile with an animal trail

If you draw a tile with an animal trail, you must place it such that it continues the existing landscape (including any savanna, animal trails, or bush). [3]

Example: You placed the animal trail tile. The animal trail, as well as the savanna, continues the landscape.

2. Placing a meeple on an animal trail

After placing a tile with an animal trail, you may place one of your meeples on that animal trail, but only if no other meeples are present along the entire trail.

Example: You place a meeple on the tile you just placed. This is legal because there are no other meeples on that trail.

3. Scoring an animal trail

An animal trail is completed when both ends are closed by bush or savanna, or when it loops back onto itself by connecting to the other end. When the trail is completed, it is scored. If one of your meeples is on a trail when it scores, you will score points from it.

You score points based on the number of different animals present on the animal trail. The number of points scored is shown below, as well as on the scoreboard.

Different animals  1 2 3 4 5
Points  1 3 6 10 15

The total number of animals on the trail does not matter, only how many different animals are present. After scoring, return your meeple from the trail to your supply.

Example: Blue closes your animal trail. Even though another player placed the tile that completed it, you will score the points from it, because your meeple is on the trail. There are three different animals on the trail, so you score 6 points.

Placing additional animals

Before you would score points from an animal trail, you may add one animal tile from your supply to that trail. The animal tile must be an animal that is not already present on that trail.

Example: On your animal trail, there is an elephant, a zebra, and a giraffe. You place a lion from your supply. Now there are four different animals on the trail, and you score 10 points instead of 6 points.

Players track their scores using the elephants placed on the scoreboard at the start of the game. When you score points, move your elephant forward that many spaces. If your elephant passes the 0 space on the scoreboard, take a scoring marker and place it with the "50" side up in front of you. If your elephant passes the 0 space again, flip the scoring marker over to the "100" side.

Example: The elephant on the scoreboard moves 6 spaces to keep track of the score.

Discard all animal tiles that were placed on the trail faceup. If a player would draw a new animal tile but there are none left in the supply, shuffle the discarded tiles facedown to create the new supply.

The Bush

1. Placing a land tile

If you draw a tile with bush, you must place it such that it continues the existing landscape (including any savanna, animal trails, or bush).

Example: Tile with a bush segment (lower right portion of tile)

2. Placing a meeple

After placing a tile with bush, you may place a meeple in that bush, but only if that bush does not have another meeple on it.

Example: You place a tile, adding to the open bush. The bush does not have any meeples on it, so you can place a meeple there.

3. Scoring a feature

A bush is completed when it does not have any open sides or gaps. When a bush is completed, it is scored. If one of your meeples is in the bush when it scores, you will score points from it. The points scored from animals in a bush are the same as those scored from an animal trail (see table below). Additionally, each bird (Safari Rules Bushes Bird.jpg) above the bush is worth 1 point.

Different animals  1 2 3 4 5
Points  1 3 6 10 15

After scoring a bush, return your meeple from the bush to your supply.

Placing additional animals

Before you would score points from a bush, you may add one animal tile from your supply on that bush. The animal tile must be an animal that is not already present in that bush, and the animal tile is discarded after the bush is scored.

Example: You add a tile to close that area of bush. A giraffe and a monkey are already in your bush, and you add a zebra tile. You now have three different animals and score 6 points from animals. There are also three birds above the bush, giving you an additional 3 points, for a total of 9 points.

The Baobab Tree

1. Placing a land tile

If you draw a tile with a baobab tree, you must place it such that it continues the existing landscape (including any savanna, animal trails, or bush).

Example: A baobab tree tile

2. Placing a meeple

You may lay a meeple onto a baobab tree you just placed. After laying a meeple on a tree, you draw two animal tiles from the supply and place them faceup in front of you.

Example: You lay your meeple onto the baobab tree you just placed and draw two animal tiles.

3. Scoring a feature

When all eight spaces around a baobab tree have tiles placed on them, return your meeple from that tree to your supply, then draw two additional animal tiles from the supply and place them faceup in front of you. You do not score any points from the baobab tree.

Example: All spaces around the baobab tree with your meeple are filled. You take back your meeple and receive two additional animal tiles.

Interim rule - note on interim rules

Since animal tokens for completing a baobab are received in the scoring phase, it is unclear at this moment if the player can use either of the two animal tokens in the same turn to boost the score of another, scoreable, feature, if it is completed by placing the tile. We recommend allowing immediate use. Alternatively, you can use an animal token received for placing a meeple on a baobab in a previous phase.

The Ranger

During your turn, the rangers can be used in one of two ways:


  • Option A: The tile does not displace a ranger

1a. Placing a land tile

You place a land tile on a space without a ranger on it.

Example: You place a tile an no ranger is displaced.

2a. No meeple placed

Instead of placing a meeple during your turn, you may move one of the two rangers to an empty space next to one or more land tiles.

Example: You can move a ranger as an alternative to placing a meeple.

3a. Score features

Score all features completed by the tile you placed. You do not score points for moving the ranger.


  • Option B: The tile displaces a ranger

1b. Placing a tile on a space with a ranger

If you place a tile on an empty space occupied by a ranger, remove the ranger and place it in front of you.

Example: You place a tile in the space with a ranger. You place the ranger in front of you.

2b. Placing a meeple

You may place a meeple on the tile you placed, following the rules for placing meeples on animal trails and bush.

Example: You place the meeple on the tile.

3b. Score features

Score all features completed by the tile you placed. You score 3 points for displacing the ranger.

After scoring, place the ranger on an empty space adjacent to one or more tiles.

Example: You place the ranger in an empty space.


Note: You may only move one ranger per turn. If you displaced a ranger with your tile (1b), you may not move a ranger instead of placing a meeple (2a). The two rangers can never occupy the same space.

The Watering Holes

In addition to using animal tiles to improve your score for animal trails and bush, you can also use them to dig watering holes in the savanna.

1. Placing a land tile

You draw a land tile and place it, continuing the landscape as normal.

2. Dig or expand a watering hole

Dig a watering hole

Instead of placing a meeple on a tile, you may start digging a watering hole. To do so, place an animal tile from your supply onto an open corner of any tile (not necessarily the tile you just placed). A corner is open if it depicts only savanna (no bush). Then place a meeple on that animal tile and immediately score 3 points.

Example: You place a land tile to extend your animal trail. Instead of placing a meeple on the tile, you start digging a watering hole. After placing the meeple on the animal tile, you score 3 points.

Expanding a watering hole

Instead of placing a meeple on the tile you just placed, you may expand a watering hole. Place an animal tile onto a land tile such that it continues to close the circle of the watering hole.

You must use an animal tile depicting a different animal than the animals already present at the watering hole. You do not place a meeple onto this animal tile.

Depending on whether you placed the second, third, or fourth (and last) animal tile on a watering hole, you score points as follows:

  • Second animal tile: 4 points
  • Third animal tile: 5 points
  • Fourth animal tile: 6 points

Note: You may not start digging a watering hole without placing a meeple on it.

Example: You place a land tile and do not place a meeple. Instead, you expand your existing watering hole (with a zebra and a giraffe) with a different animal (monkey). Since it is the third tile of the watering hole, you score 5 points.

Exception: You may start digging a new watering hole diagonally across from an existing watering hole. Since the animal tiles do not touch yet, you place a meeple on this tile. Once the watering hole is complete, two meeples will occupy it. In this instance, it is possible for two of the same animal to occupy the watering hole.

Example: You place a land tile and start digging a new watering hole with a giraffe. Since your watering hole does not connect with the existing watering hole placed by Blue across from you, you may also place a giraffe.

Interim rule - note on interim rules

Although the animal tokens may, at some later point, be connected to form a single waterhole, this token begins a new watering hole, so the player receives 3 points.

3. Scoring a watering hole

When the fourth animal tile of a watering hole is placed, it is complete. The owner of the watering hole scores three points. If two meeples occupy the watering hole, both players score three points. If both meeples belong to the same player, that player still only scores 3 points.

Example: You place a tile and, instead of placing a meeple, complete a watering hole. You score 6 ponts, Blue scores 3 points, and Blue‘s meeple is returned.

Return all meeples from the watering hole to their owners.

Multiple meeples on the same feature

Although you may not place a meeple on a feature (an animal trail or bush) that is already occupied by a meeple, it is possible that, by connecting separate features, multiple meeples will occupy the same feature. When a feature with multiple meeples on it is scored, only the player with the most meeples on that feature scores points. If there is a tie for the most meeples on a feature, all tied players score the full amount of points. If multiple players have meeples on the same feature, all scoring players may add a different animal to the feature before scoring. Animal tiles only add to the score of the player who placed them.


Example: Before taking your turn, both you and Blue had one meeple each on two separate animal trails. You place a tile and connect the trails. The trail is now completed. There are four different animals on the trail, and you add a fifth, different animal. You score 15 points. Blue does not add another animal and scores 10 points.
Example: Before taking your turn, these three meeples were in separate bushes. You place a tile and connect them into one bush. This completes the bush, so it scores. You do not add another animal tile and score 11 points (6 points for three different animals and 5 points for birds). Only you score points because you have the most meeples in the bush.


Summary

1. Placing a Land tile

  • You must place the tile you drew such that it continues the landscape and connects with existing features.
  • If you are unable to place the tile you drew, return it to the box and draw a new one.
  • If you place a tile in a space occupied by a ranger, you displace the ranger.

2. Placing a meeple

  • You may place a meeple only on a feature on the land tile you just placed. When doing so, you must ensure that another meeple is not already occupying the feature you are placing on.
  • If you lay a meeple on a baobab tree, you draw two animal tiles.
  • If you do not place a meeple, you may instead dig a new watering hole, expand a watering hole, or move a ranger.

3. Scoring a feature

  • Completed features are scored at the end of each turn. After scoring, players return their meeples from the scored features to their supply.
  • A completed animal trail scores points based on the number of different animals present.
  • A completed bush scores points in the same way as a completed animal trail, plus 1 point per bird.
  • A completed baobab tree allows you to draw two additional animal tiles.
  • A completed waterhole scores 3 points. [4]
  • Placing a ranger after being displaced by the tile just placed scores 3 points. [4]
  • If there are multiple meeples on a single scored feature, the player with the most meeples is the only one who scores. If multiple players are tied, the tied players all score full points.

Game end and final scoring

The game ends after a player draws the last land tile. That player takes their turn, then final scoring is conducted as follows:

  • Animal trails and bush
Each player with a meeple on the feature scores 1 point for every animal and bird present. Different types of animals do not matter. All players with meeples on the feature score points, regardless of who has the most meeples. [5]
  • Animal tiles
You score 1 point for each animal tile in your supply.
  • Baobab tress and watering holes
Meeples on baobab trees and watering holes do not score points.


Example: Final scoring
A: Blue does not score any points for the meeple on the baobab tree.
B: You score 2 points for the two animals on the trail.
C: You and Blue have meeples in the large bush. With four animals and six birds in the bush, you and Blue both score 10 points. [6]
D: Blue scores 2 points for the one animal (ape) and one bird in the small bush.
E: You score 3 points for animal tiles in your supply.

After final scoring is complete, the player with the most points wins. If multiple players are tied, they share the victory. [7]

Use of a Table

A number of questions have been asked about rules related to the play area itself [8], including what happens when the edge of the area is reached, or if a table has to be used for play. The following clarifications are from Georg Wild from HiG (5/2013):

  • The edge of the table is the limit for the game if, as stated in the rules, a table is used.
  • The rules state that the starting tile is placed in the middle of the table. If all of the tiles are shifted to allow more room, the starting tile would no longer be in the middle. So in principle, total shifting of the tiles is not allowed. Additionally, with a manual shift of all of the tiles, the tiles and figures on the play area can slip, which could lead to incorrect positioning of tiles or figures.
  • Addition of a second table is possible if one of an appropriate height is added to the first table. If a table is extended (as with an additional panel), make sure that the tiles and figures on the play area do not slip.
  • Playing on the floor: The rules technically do not allow this, because the rules state that the first tile is placed in the middle of the table. Playing on the floor is not forbidden, however, if use of a table is not feasible. If the floor is used, tiles must be placed so all tiles are visible to all players. Tiles cannot be placed under the sofa, cabinet/shelf, etc.
  • It is important generally, that all the players in the round agree how to play:
    • Table - standard
    • Table - with "total shifting" of tiles
    • Table - with extension
    • Floor
  • Continue to play fairly and not intentionally unfair to other players.

Tile reference

Total Land Tiles: 72 Tiles + 1 Start Tile

Safari Tile 01.jpg x2
- | -
Safari Tile 02.jpg x1
E
Safari Tile 03.jpg x4
E | G | G | Z
Safari Tile 04.jpg x3
A | E | L
Safari Tile 05.jpg x1
L
Safari Tile 06.jpg x4
A | A | E | L
Safari Tile 07.jpg x5
E | G | G | L | Z
Safari Tile 08.jpg x1
AA
Safari Tile 09.jpg x1
AA
Safari Tile 10.jpg x2
LL | ZZ
Safari Tile 11.jpg x3
GG | ZZ | ZZ
Safari Tile 12.jpg x1
Z
Safari Tile 13.jpg x2
G | Z
Safari Tile 14.jpg x3
A | AE | ZZ
Safari Tile 15.jpg x1
AE
Safari Tile 16.jpg x1
Z
Safari Tile 17.jpg x1
G
Safari Tile 18.jpg x1
EL
Safari Tile 19.jpg x1
EGG
Safari Tile 20.jpg x5
A | A | G | L | Z
Safari Tile 21.jpg x4
E | L | Z | -
Safari Tile 22.jpg x1
L
Safari Tile 23.jpg x1
AEE
Safari Tile 24.jpg x1
EEL
Safari Tile 25.jpg x3
AL | AL | L
Safari Tile 26.jpg x5
EE | EG | EZ | LL | LZ
Safari Tile 27.jpg x2
AG | AL
Safari Tile 28.jpg x2
G | Z
Safari Tile 29.jpg x1
E
Safari Tile 30.jpg x4
G | G | L | Z
Safari Tile 31.jpg x1
LZ
Safari Tile 32.jpg x1
GG
Safari Tile 33.jpg x3
A | A | G
Safari Start Tile.jpg x1
AEG (Start Tile)

If several tiles of one type are present, it is listed which and how many animals are on each one.

The individual tiles are separated by a pipe symbol. Birds are not listed.

A = ape | E = elephant | G = giraffe | L = lion | Z = zebra | "-" = no animal


Total animal / watering hole tiles: 50

Safari Animal A.jpg x10 A
Safari Animal E.jpg x10 E
Safari Animal G.jpg x10 G
Safari Animal L.jpg x10 L
Safari Animal Z.jpg x10 Z

Letters indicate the animal included on each land tile:

A = ape | E = elephant | G = giraffe | L = lion | Z = zebra


Total 50/100 scoring markers: 5

Safari Tile 50 Points.jpg x5

Footnotes

For Icons licensing and explanation please visit Icons page.

  1. Icon World Black.png Tiles can also be placed into a bag or box to be drawn randomly.
  2. Icon World Black.png It is much more convenient to put the animal tokens into a small bag and draw them randomly as required.
  3. Icon Open Book.png In the rare case that a tile cannot legally be placed anywhere, it is removed from the game, and the player draws another.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Icon Open Book.png Although not included in the manual, included here for the sake of completeness.
  5. Icon Double Arrow Black.png This is a discrepancy with the HiG rules, that stipulate that the feature owner is the one scoring (It there is a tie, it has to be considered as per the normal rules.) On the other hand, the ZMG rules allow all players present in the feature to score.
  6. Icon Double Arrow Black.png The translation of the same example in the HiG reads as follows:
    You and Blue have meples in the large bush. Since you has more meeples than Blue there, you get the points for the animals. With four animals and six birds in the bush, you score 10 points
  7. Icon World Black.png Once the final score is known, the winner is the player with the most points. The rules do not include tiebreakers. That is, rules explaining the situation when two or more players share the same score at the end of the game.
  8. Icon World Black.png These clarifications where provided for the Carcassonne game and can be also b applied to any spin-offs, including Safari.