Halflings

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Sample of Halfling tiles: the spirals show the Halfling I tiles (left) and the Halfling II tiles (right)

General info and comments

Punchout
Halfings I symbol
Halfings II symbol

Halflings was originally released by Hans im Glück in 2020. This mini expansion was released for the 1st Edition in 2014.

This mini-expansion includes tiles of two mini-expansions published in 2014. While tiles marked with Symbol Halflings1 C2.png match those of the version which was published in SpielBox magazine (www.spielboxshop.de), tiles marked with Symbol Halflings2 C2.png stem from another version which was originally available at www.cundco.de exclusively.

This expansion has been developed for the Carcassonne basic game. All the basic game rules still apply in addition to the expansion rules below. You can combine it with other expansions - but at your own risk – i.e. there will be no official rules for these combinations.

Contents

  • 24 new “half-sized” triangular land tiles
Examples of new half-sized, triangular land tiles with various features
This expansion includes 4 tiles with symbols of the expansions Exp. 9 - Hills & Sheep and the Mini #7 - Crop Circles

Rules

Preparation

For your first game shuffle all triangular tiles face down (except for those with symbols from expansions). Each player draws 3 triangular tiles, takes a look at them and puts their tiles in front of them face down.

If you have already played Halflings before, you can play the following version: At the beginning of the game put down all triangular tiles face up. Determine which player is first. The player whose turn is last, chooses a tile and places it in front of them face down. The remaining players continue to do the same counter-clockwise until everyone has drawn 3 tiles. The remaining triangular tiles are put back in the box. If you like to play using more triangular tiles, you can do so (depending on the number of players).

Gameplay

1. Placing a tile

Instead of drawing and placing a regular land tile you can choose to place one of your triangular tiles instead. The half-sized tiles are placed according to the rules of the Carcassonne base game, meaning that at least one side of your tile has to continue the landscape of one or more existing tiles. The long side of the triangular tile may never be placed next to a regular land tile continuing its landscape. You may however place a half-sized tile with its long side adjacent to that of another half-sized tile if it continues the landscape.

Example 1: Two examples of how to place a half-sized tile.
Example 2: A half-sized tile cannot be placed this way.

Game end [1]

The game ends immediately at the end of the turn in which the last normal (not half-sized) land tile is placed. If any player still has any unplayed half-sized tiles in front of them, they may no longer play them.

2. Placing a meeple

After having placed a half-sized tile, you may now place a meeple on your tile according to the rules of the base game.

You may place a meeple even if there is already a meeple on an adjacent half-sized tile. [2] [3]

Example: Two meeples can stand on two adjacent triangular tiles.

3. Scoring a feature

If you complete a feature with half-sized tiles, it is scored according to the normal rules but considering occupied spaces (areas) and not individual tiles. [4]

 Icon Open Book.png Question: When scoring a city or a road, how should we consider two Halfling tiles in one space?

Answer: The Halflings count as one occupied space (area). [Note that spaces occupied by one or two Halfling tiles are considered equivalent to a regular tile. -ed.] (1/2021)

> Roads and cities

As per the base game rules, completed cities cannot contain gaps. In this case, this means they cannot contain square or triangular gaps. Roads will follow the same rule: A road with a triangular gap will be considered incomplete too.

Example 1: This "city" containing a triangular gap is considered incomplete, since a city is not completed if it contains a gap. Actually, the picture shows 3 separate incomplete cities.
Example 2: This city containing triangular tiles is completed and can be scored. It includes no triangular (or square) gaps.

The scoring of a completed city or road will follow the normal rules but one or two triangular tiles in one square space will be counted as one regular tile.

Example 3: Red plays the Halfling tile completing his city. He scores 8 points, since the two triangular tiles are counted as one regular tile. The scoring considers a city with three regular tiles and 1 coat of arms.
Example 4: Blue plays the Halfling tile completing his road. He scores 4 points, since the two triangular tiles are counted as one regular tile. The scoring considers a road with four regular tiles.

> Monasteries

A triangular tile in the surroundings of a monastery is counted just like a regular land tile (it scores 1 point and can complete the monastery). The triangular tile does not have to be adjacent to the tile with the monastery itself in order to complete the monastery.

If two triangular tiles have been placed instead of a regular land tile, you still only score 1 point for this occupied space. [5]

Example 5: In all of the three examples the monastery is complete and earns you 9 points.
Final scoring

> Monasteries

At the end of the game, an incomplete monastery will score 1 point for the occupied space with the monastery tile and 1 point for each occupied adjacent space.

Final scoring example 1: Blue scores 6 points for their monastery:
  • 1 point for the space occupied by the monastery, even if it occupied by two triangular tiles
  • 1 point for each adjacent space occupied by square tiles.
Red scores 5 points for their monastery:
  • 1 point for the space occupied by the monastery
  • 1 point for the occupied adjacent spaces no matter if they have 1 or 2 triangular tiles or square tiles

> Fields

Field scoring is affected by the triangular gaps in the landscape. Triangular gaps interrupt the field continuity and define boundaries. (1/2021)

Final scoring example 2: The meeples occupy two separate fields:
  • Red and Blue share the field on the left and will score 3 points each for it.
  • Red is alone in the field on the right and will score 3 points for it.

Tiles with expansion symbols

The following three tiles show symbols of the 9th expansion Hills & Sheep which rules do apply here. The rules of tiles 1 and 2 can be applied without further game material. In order to use the sheep on tile 3, you need material included in the 9th expansion.

Halflings C2 Tile Features Hills And Sheep.png

1 Vineyard | If a monastery is being completed and scored, its owner earns 3 extra points for each vineyard depicted on the tiles in the vicinity of the monastery (the square space with the monastery and the 8 spaces surrounding it). [6]

2 Hill | If you place the triangular tile depicting the hill, you draw a regular land tile according to the rules of the 9th expansion and place it under the hill tile. The free triangular space can later be filled by placing another half-sized tile. The hill counts for the whole space and therefore also for a potential second triangular tile. If you have a meeple on a feature with a hill, ties for scoring that feature are broken in your favor.

3 Sheep | You earn 3 points for the sheep on this tile if you guide your flock to the stable. [7] A wolf cannot scare these sheep away. [8]

The tile depicting the crop circle is played differently from the normal crop circle tiles (see Crop Circles).

Halflings C2 Tile Features Crop Circles.png

4 Crop Circle | You play a normal turn with the crop circle tile. [9] Afterwards you determine a kind of meeple (knight, highwayman or farmer) and choose one of the following actions which all players (including yourself) must complete, starting with the player to your left:

Each player either... [10]

A) ... may take a meeple from their supply and place it next to another one of their meeples of this kind on the same land tile. [11]

OR

B) ... must remove one of their meeples of the determined kind from a land tile and put it back into their supply.

If a player does not have any meeples of the determined kind, they cannot complete neither action A nor B.

Rules changes

The Halflings rules have become a source of great controversy due to the many gaps and conclusions left to the reader.

The rules focus on explaining the especial case for monasteries only: The rules from 2014 did not even mention how roads and cities were to be scored and the rules from 2020 just indicate that completed roads and cities with triangular tiles are scored according to the normal rules.

In 2014, the lack of information about road and city scoring led to the interpretation that they should be scored according to the principle provided for monasteries that two triangular tiles in one square space were to be counted as one tile. This assumption would have some consequences when considering interactions with other expansions since triangular tiles would not be considered individual tiles in some cases.

  • Scoring features with the rules from 2014:
    • Roads and cities are scored according to the number of square tiles (2 triangular tiles are considered 1 square tile)
    • Monasteries are scored according the square spaces with tiles (2 triangular tiles are considered 1 tile) - Monasteries can score up to 9 points

The clarifications from 10/2015 affected the scoring of cities and roads (each triangular tile would be considered individually from this moment on), but it changes the way monasteries should be scored, since each tile would be counted individually for monasteries too. So monasteries could score up to 18 points as you could cram that many Halflings tiles in the space occupied by a monastery and the 8 adjacent spaces. These clarifications covered some interactions with other expansions, not all of them, but provided some hints to address some other by analogy (with some house rules, if needed). They would represent a lot of consequences when considering interactions with other expansions since triangular tiles would be considered as individual tiles now. (Double-sized tile were considered individual tiles too, so this also added additional distortions to the way some expansions interacted).

  • Scoring features with the clarifications from 10/2015:
    • Roads and cities are scored according to the number of individual tiles (square, triangular or double sized)
    • Monasteries are scored according the number of individual tiles (square, triangular or double sized) - Monasteries can score up to 18 points

Later in 2020, the re-release of Halflings for Carcassonne II included similar rules to those from 2014. There was a brief indication on how roads and cities should be scored and the rules for the monasteries were a step back from the clarifications from 10/2015, returning to the original ones from 2014. The clarifications from 10/2015 were still applied except for the scoring of monasteries (and therefore German castles by extension).

  • Scoring features with the rules from 2020 + clarifications from 10/2015:
    • Roads and cities are scored according to the number of individual tiles (square, triangular or double sized)
    • Monasteries are scored according the square spaces with tiles (square, triangular or double sized) - Monasteries can score up to 9 points

A new set of clarifications were provided in 1/2021. These clarifications confirmed that the previous clarifications from 10/2015 were outdated and the same principles were applied to the scoring of roads, cities and monasteries. Therefore, the principles established in 2014 where to be applied universally.

  • Scoring features with the clarifications from 1/2021:
    • Roads and cities are scored according to the number of occupied spaces (2 triangular tiles are considered as 1 occupied square space)
    • Monasteries are scored according the square spaces with tiles (square, triangular or double sized) - Monasteries can score up to 9 points
    • Additionally, all expansions should consider occupied spaces for their mechanics: the dragon movement, the tower range, fliers, German castles...

The following table summarizes the evolution of the rules and its consequences.

Rules Updates
Feature Tiles occupying a space Carcassonne I rules from 2014 Clarifications from 10/2015 Carcassonne II rules from 2020 Clarifications from 1/2021
Road / City   Scored per tile Scored per tile Scored per tile Scored per occupied space
1 square tile 1 tile 1 tile 1 tile 1 tile → 1 occupied space
1 triangular tile 1 tile (1) 1 tile 1 tile 1 tile → 1 occupied space
2 triangular tiles 2 tiles → counted as 1 tile (1) 2 tiles 2 tiles 2 tiles → 1 occupied space
1 part of double-sized tile N/A (2) 1 tile 1 tile (3) 1 tile part → 1 occupied space (6)
Monastery   Scored per occupied space Scored per tile Scored per occupied space Scored per occupied space
1 square tile 1 tile → 1 occupied space 1 tile 1 tile → 1 occupied space 1 tile → 1 occupied space
1 triangular tile 1 tile → 1 occupied space 1 tile (4) 1 tile → 1 occupied space 1 tile → 1 occupied space
2 triangular tiles 2 tiles → 1 occupied space 2 tiles (4) 2 tiles → 1 occupied space 2 tiles → 1 occupied space
1 part of double-sized tile N/A (2) 1 tile (4) 1 tile → 1 or 2 occupied spaces (5) 1 tile part → 1 occupied space
  • Note:
    • (1) There was no explicit rules and the rules. It was assumed that triangular tiles on the same space were considered counted as 1 tile as an adaptation of the scoring rules for monasteries. This may be the result of a misinterpretation.
    • (2) Double-sized tiles were released a year later so no provision for double-sized tiles is made in the rules from 2014.
    • (3) Not covered in the rules, but aligned with the interpretation of the rules from 2020 and the clarifications from 10/2015.
    • (4) Triangular tiles and double-sized tiles were counted as individual tiles for monasteries.
    • (5) Not covered in the rules, but change consistent with monastery scoring by occupied space from 2020. It would override the clarifications provided in 10/2015.
    • (6) Roads in Leipzig tiles are counted as 1 tile even is spread across two spaces.

Other expansions

>> General considerations

  • When a Halfling tile is beside a triangular gap, the Halfling tile counts as a single tile (one occupied space). When 2 Halfling tiles are side-by-side to create one square, together they count only as a single tile (one occupied apace). This is relevant when considering monastery scoring, city scoring, road scoring, Dragon movement, the Plague token placement, the Flier movement, etc. (10/2014; updated 1/2021) [12]
  • As a general rule, it was confirmed that all mechanics have to be implemented considering square spaces (areas) conforming a grid, so scorings, ranges and trajectories consider those spaces. As a result:
    • Tiles are placed individually according to the usual rules (any effects triggered by the tile when drawn or placed will follow the usual rules).
    • Figures and tokens are placed on tiles according to the usual rules.
    • The grid of square spaces will be used as a reference framework for determining adjacency, feature/bonus/figure scoring, figure/token movements, action ranges, and trajectories. The rules considering regular square tiles will have to be interpreted as affecting any tiles overlapping a particular square space:
      • This represents a one-to-one equivalence with square tiles.
      • This affects one or two triangular tiles in a square space that will be considered as one occupied space. The triangular tile(s) occupying the space will be considered as one tile for practical purposes.
      • This also affects a full double-sized tile if any of its two halves occupies a given square space.
    • Figures/tokens are placed with tile resolution but any movement follows the grid of squares (dragon, flea tokens)
    • Figures/tokens/symbols affecting a (square) tile will affect any tiles sharing/overlapping the same square space (dragon, fairy, flea tokens, little buildings, hills...)
  • Monastery completeness and scoring takes into consideration the adjacent spaces: all adjacent of them have to be occupied no matter if by a square tile, or by one or two Halfling tiles. So there may not be a unoccupied adjacent square space. This approach will be considered for features similar to monasteries by extension: all monastic buildings (abbeys, shrines, Japanese buildings, German monasteries, Dutch & Belgian monasteries, Darmstadt churches), gardens and German castles.
  • This geometry change in tiles implies a shift and whenever we consider adjacent tiles around a feature, we should consider all the tiles crammed into the adjacent spaces around that feature. This would include, for example, big top scoring, acrobat placement, watchtower scoring, bathhouse completion, the meeple trapping by the Vodyanoy tile, the Baga Yaga's Hut scoring (although it already considered empty spaces), the Darmstadt church bonus, in addition to castle fiefs.
  • At present HiG will not provide detailed clarifications about the interactions with Halflings. Combining Halflings with other expansions will then happen "at the players' own risk." In such cases, house rules will have to be agreed and applied. However the latest clarifications have provided a foundation to consistently solve the issues existing in the past for both triangular and double-sized tiles.


Let's see some interactions when applying the principles explained above:


>> The Princess and The Dragon - Dragon movement [13]

  • The dragon moves following the grid of square spaces by affecting all the tiles overlapping the space it occupies.
  • The dragon may eat all the affected figures in one square tile, one or two triangular tiles in one square space or a full double-sized tile.
Example: The dragon moves counting square spaces. It lands on particular tiles but it affects all the tiles overlapping the space it occupies (as in step 2). It also skips any triangular gap in its way (as in step 4).


>> The Princess and The Dragon - Fairy protection [14]

  • The fairy protects the tiles overlapping the space it occupies, matching the action range for the dragon. So the fairy may protect one square tile, one or two triangular tiles in one square space or a full double-sized tile.


>> The Tower - Tower range [13]

  • If a square space is in range, the tower will be able to capture one meeple on the tiles overlapping that space. So the tower may capture one meeple located in one square tile, one or two triangular tiles in one square space or a full double-sized tile.
Example: The picture shows the tiles affected by the tower using different shades of green to identify tiles within range 1 and range 2. The range stretch takes into account square spaces. The tower may capture meeples in any of the tiles overlapping the square spaces in range, no matter if the space is occupied by a square tile or 1 or two triangular tiles, like in this case.


>> Abbey and the Mayor - Part 1: Abbey placement and scoring [15]

  • An abbey can be placed if a Halfling tile is on one of the edges, even if there is a Halfling gap on one of the edges. See the clarification images below. (3/2015)
Example 1: The abbey can be placed here, neighboring a side of the halfling
Example 2: The abbey can also be placed here, even if it is neighboring the gap left by the halfling
Note on Example 2: the abbey placement is allowed as the halfling occupies the "place" of a normal landscape tile and the existing gap, marked as a striped area, is not taken into account
  • Abbeys should follow the official rules defined for scoring monasteries.

>> Abbey and the Mayor - Part 2: Barn placement [13]

  • A barn can be placed at an intersection of four square spaces completely occupied by field corners. There may be no gaps in any of the four corners. (1/2021)
Examples with square and triangular tiles:
  • A: The barn can be placed in this case
  • B: The barn cannot be placed in these cases
  • The corners may be occupied by square tiles, one or two triangular tiles or double-sized tiles.
See the following examples involving Halfling tiles and double-size tiles (see Castles in Germany and The Markets of Leipzig.) (4/2016; updated 1/2021)
Examples with triangle and double-sized (its long side) tiles:
  • A: The barn can be placed in these cases
  • B: The barn cannot be placed in these cases
Examples with triangle and double-sized (its short side) tiles:
  • A: The barn can be placed in these cases
  • B: The barn cannot be placed in these cases
  • Note: The clarifications about triangular and double-sized tiles from 1/2021 override, in certain cases, the original four-tile intersection requirement for the placement of the barn defined originally for square tiles. In the end, no matter the tile geometries, a barn can only be placed at an intersection completely occupied by tiles, the same as if it there where four regular square tiles.


>> Abbey and the Mayor - Part 3: Barn scoring [16]

  • A barn can only be placed at intersection with no (triangular or square) gaps, so the barn is placed in one field and it is scored as usual.


>> Count, King and Robber - Shrine scoring [17]

  • Shrines should follow the official rules defined for scoring monasteries for the sake of consistency.


>> Bridges, Castles and Bazaars - Bridge placement [18]

  • A bridge can be placed on a tile if it stands on field segments. This could be translated to a space occupied by two triangular tiles (but not by only one triangular tile). The bridge would count as one road segment.


>> The Flier (Flying Machines) - Flier distance and placement [13]

  • The flier moves following the grid of square spaces to calculate its trajectory and distance. Once the target space is determined, the flier may occupy any incomplete feature on the any of the tiles overlapping the give space. So the flier may pick a feature on one square tile, one or two triangular tiles in one square space or a full double-sized tile.
Example 1: This image shows how square tiles and holes are considered when calculating the flier distance for a horizontal trajectory. This example follows the official rules.
Example 2: This image shows how the flier can land on any square or triangular tile occupying a given space when following an horizontal trajectory.
Example 3: This image shows how the flier can land on any square or triangular tile occupying a given space for a given distance when following an diagonal trajectory.
Example 4: This image shows how the flier can land on any square or triangular tile occupying a given space for a given distance when following an diagonal trajectory.
Example 5: This image shows how the flier can land on any square or triangular tile occupying a given space for a given distance when following an diagonal trajectory.

>> German monasteries and Japanese buildings / Dutch and Belgian monasteries - Abbot scoring

  • Special monasteries would consider occupied square spaces for their scoring no matter the tiles occupying them. [19]
Example: RED will get 1 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 1 = 8 points from scoring his/her abbot:
  • 1 point from the monastery tile
  • 2 points from the vertical column above the monastery tile (1 point for each occupied space)
  • 2 points from the vertical column below the monastery tile (1 point for each occupied space, one of them by a triangular tile)
  • 2 points from the horizontal row to the left of the monastery tile (1 point for each occupied space, one of them by two triangular tiles)
  • 1 point from the horizontal row to the right of the monastery tile (1 point for the space occupied by a single triangular tile)


>> Castles in Germany - Completion of German castles [20]

  • A German castle is worth 2 points for the German Castle tile plus 1 point per surrounding occupied space (no matter if by square or triangular tiles). The scoring takes into consideration occupied spaces.
Example: This German castle will get 12 points:
  • 2 point from the German castle tile
  • 1 points from each occupied adjacent space


>> Little Buldings - Area affected by Little Building [21]

  • A little building affects the all the tiles overlapping the space it is placed on. This consideration comes from the fact that two triangular tiles count as a single tile when scoring.


>> The Plague - Plague spreading [22]

  • The flea tokens placed on a tile affect the full square space it occupies.
  • Flea tokens move according to the square grid, independently of the tiles occupying each square space. [23]
Example: This picture shows in green a contiguous outbreak area. Triangular gaps do not break its continuity and both triangular tiles in a square are affected by a flea token placed on one of them (the flea token affects the whole square space).

Tile distribution

Total Tiles: 24 halves

Halflings I

Total Tiles: 12 halves


Halfling 1 C2 Tile 01.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 02.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 03.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 04.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 05.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 06.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 07.png x1
(W)
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 08.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 09.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 10.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 11.png x1
 
Halfling 1 C2 Tile 12.png x1
 

One of the tiles has a small illustration on it. The letter in brackets shows which illustration is on the tile:

Feature WaterTower C2.png
W | Water tower

Halflings II

Total Tiles: 12 halves


Halfling 2 C2 Tile 01.png x1
Vineyard
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 02.png x1
Sheep
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 03.png x1
Hill
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 04.png x1
Crop circle
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 05.png x1
 
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 06.png x1
 
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 07.png x1
 
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 08.png x1
 
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 09.png x1
 
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 10.png x1
 
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 11.png x1
(W)
Halfling 2 C2 Tile 12.png x1
 

One of the tiles has a small illustration on it. The letter in brackets shows which illustration is on the tile:

Feature WaterTower C2.png
W | Water tower

Footnotes

For Icons licensing and explanation please visit Icons page.

  1. Icon Open Book.png This section was included in the rules from 2014 but omitted in the rules from 2020.
  2. Icon Double Arrow Black.png This sentence is a translation of the German rules. The English translation by HiG had a different meaning, probably by mistake: "You may also place a Meeple on an adjacent triangular tile if there already is one."
  3. Icon World Black.png This comment indicates that triangular tiles are independent, even if they occupy the same square space.
  4. Icon Double Arrow Black.png This sentence is based on the German wording but including the clarifications from 1/2021.
    The English version has a different meaning, possibly by mistake: "If you complete a feature by placing a half-sized tile, it is being scored according to the rules of the base game."
  5. Icon World Black.png Therefore, monasteries are scored taking into account the spaces occupied by the monastery tile and by tiles (1 or 2) in the adjacent spaces. The number of tiles occupying these spaces is irrelevant. This means that a completed monastery will always score 9 points during the game.
  6. Icon World Black.png The wording has been updated to cover the cases derived from the introduction of Halflings. The original wording only mentioned the 8 adjacent tiles, assuming the rules for square tiles only: "If a monastery is being completed and scored, its owner earns 3 extra points for each vineyard depicted on the 8 tiles surrounding the monastery." With Halflings there may be up to 16 adjacent tiles. Additionally, since there is a half-sized tile with a monastery and another with a vineyard that can be placed together in the same space, this means that there may be vineyards not only on the tiles on adjacent spaces but also on the same space as the monastery. The rules should account for all these case.
    Example 1: Blue scores this monastery on a triangular tile sharing its square space with another triangular tile with a vineyard. Blue receives 12 points (9 for the monastery and 3 for the vineyard).
    Example 2: Blue scores this monastery on a triangular tile with a vineyard on a tile on an adjacent space. Blue receives 12 points (9 for the monastery and 3 for the vineyard).
  7. Icon Open Book.png The sheep on the tile counts as a "permanent" sheep token every time that a shepherd on the associated field scores its sheep. (11/2014)
  8. Icon Double Arrow Black.png We are replacing this sentence with a translation of German version. The English wording is somewhat misleading : "A wolf cannot scatter your flock."
  9. Icon World Black.png We use a translation of the German rules for clarity. The English wording is this: "Place the triangular crop circle tile according to the rules."
  10. Icon Double Arrow Black.png We used a translation of the German rules. The English rules contain a mistranslation stating that:
    "Each player must either...
    A) ... take a meeple from their supply and place it next to another one of their meeples of this kind on the same land tile.
    OR
    B) ... remove one of their meeples of the determined kind from a land tile and put it back into their supply."
  11. Icon World Black.png The meeple must be placed next to one of your meeple, that is, on the same feature on the same tile.
  12. Icon Double Arrow Black.png After several changes, the original clarification from 10/2014 is valid again. The clarifications from 10/2015 are now outdated as indicated in 1/2021.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 Icon World Black.png The clarifications from 1/2021 covered this interaction and the discrepancy with the clarifications from 10/2015.
  14. Icon World Black.png The clarifications from 1/2021 did not covered this interaction explicitly, so the general principles provided are used in this case to be consistent with the effect of the dragon.
  15. Icon World Black.png This is an adaptation of the scoring rules for monasteries and the clarifications provided for the placement of abbeys with adjacent triangular tiles.
  16. Icon World Black.png This is a consequence of the placement of the barn ass indicated in the clarifications from 1/2021. The clarifications from 10/2015 allowed triangular gaps at an intersection with a barn. This created some issues with field continuity, that have been removed with the latest clarifications.
  17. Icon World Black.png This is an adaptation of the scoring rules for monasteries.
  18. Icon World Black.png This is an adaptation of the general principles provided. There is no explicit clarification for this interaction.
  19. Icon Open Book.png A triangle tile takes the place of a regular landscape tile. Thus, a single triangle hole (half-tile hole) in the map does not stop the row or column for scoring for German and Dutch/Belgian Monasteries. Only a hole of a complete regular landscape tile interrupts the row or column. (3/2015)
    Icon World Black.png This clarifications would also apply to Japanese Buildings.
  20. Icon World Black.png There are no explicit clarifications about scoring German castles. This is an adaptation of the scoring taking into consideation the scoring for monasteries.
  21. Icon World Black.png There is no official clarification regarding how Little Buildings interact with Halflings beyond the general considerations provided.
  22. Icon World Black.png There are no explicit clarifications about spreading the plague after the clarifications from 10/2015. The approach applied combines those for the dragon and German monasteries.
  23. Icon World Black.png Given the clarification provided for German monasteries, it seems apparent that a single triangle hole would not prevent spread of the Plague in that direction, as the presence of a Halfling still counts as a full tile with no official gap. (3/2015)